Salobrena

250px-Fortaleza_árabe_en_SalobreñaSalobreña is a town on the Costa Tropical in Granada, Spain. It claims a history stretching back 6,000 years.

There are two main parts of Salobreña; The first is The Old Town which sits atop a rocky prominence and is a cluster of whitewashed houses and quirky steep narrow streets leading up to a 10th century Moorish castle. This is called ‘El Castillo De Salobreña’ which is one of its main tourist attractions. The second part or Salobreña is new developments which spread from the bottom of The Old Town right to the Beach. The whole town is almost surrounded by sugarcane fields on each side along the coast and further inland.

Another tourist attraction in Salobreña is ‘El Peñon’ (The Rock) which divides two of Salobreña’s five beaches and juts out between Playa La Guardia and Playa de la Charca/Solamar and into the sea.

The last remaining cane sugar factory in Europe is located along the coast just west of the village of La Caleta de Salobreña.

Lanjarón

250px-LanjarónLanjarón is a municipality and town in the Alpujarras area in the province of Granada in Andalusia, Spain.

Lanjarón has a ruined castle and chalybeate baths.
This spa town is most famous, however, for its eponymous bottled water company, the first ever established in Spain, whose products are sold throughout the country.

On the 23rd of June, the town of Lanjaron celebrates its annual fiesta of San Juan, known as the biggest water fight in Spain. On the night of the 23rd, people from far and wide come to celebrate the midnight madness. For one hour, starting at midnight until 1am, the streets are packed with people and their buckets, water pistols, fire hoses and lorries filled with water.

Guadix

220px-Cathedral_-_Guadix_-_Spain_-_20110808Guadix, a city of southern Spain, in the province of Granada; on the left bank of the river Guadix, a sub-tributary of the Guadiana Menor, and on the Madrid-Valdepeñas-Almería railway. It occupies part of an elevated plateau among the northern foothills of the Sierra Nevada.
The city was once famous for its cutlery; but its modern manufactures (chiefly earthenware, hempen goods, and hats) are inconsiderable. It has some trade in wool, cotton, flax, corn and liqueurs. The warm mineral springs of Cortes y Graena, much frequented during the summer, are 6 miles west.

Almuñécar

250px-Plage_d'Almunecar-Paul_MunhovenAlmuñécar is a municipality in the Spanish Autonomous Region of Andalusia on the Costa Tropical between Nerja (Málaga) and Motril (Granada). It has a subtropical climate. Almuñécar lies in the Province of Granada, and has around 26,000 citizens (2006). Since the death of Francisco Franco in 1975, the town of Almuñécar has become one of the most important tourist towns in Granada and this section of coast is now called the Costa Tropical. Almuñécar has good transport connections and a football (soccer) stadium.
It is an important setting in Laurie Lee’s account of the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, in As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning, referred to as “Castillo” to disguise people’s identities.
Almuñécar’s coat of arms, which shows the turbaned heads of three Berber pirates floating in the sea, was granted to the town by King Carlos I in 1526 for having destroyed a Berber raiding force.

Lloret de Mar

Platja_de_LloretLloret de Mar is a Mediterranean coastal town in Catalonia and one of the most popular holiday resorts on the Costa Brava. It is 40 kilometres from Girona and 75 kilometres from Barcelona and therefore easily accessible. With a population of 39,363 (as of 1st January 2009) it is the second largest town in the Selva comarca (county) of Catalonia, in Spain.
For decades Lloret de Mar has attracted summer visitors on package tours and is considered as one of the most important resorts on the Costa Brava. Lloret de Mar’s main beach (length: 1,630 m; width: 45 m; white sand) is one of the most popular Costa Brava beaches and is consistently awarded the Blue Flag for cleanliness.
Lloret’s nightlife attracts an 18-30s crowd mainly from Luxembourg, Portugal, Denmark, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Poland, Italy, the Netherlands and other, mostly European, countries.

San Sebastián

San_Sebastian_at_night_from_Monte_UrgullSan Sebastián or Donostia is a city and municipality located in the north of Spain, in the Basque Country, on the coast of the Bay of Biscay and 20 km away from the French border. The city is the capital of Gipuzkoa, in the autonomous community of the Basque Country. The municipality’s population is 186,122 (2011), and its metropolitan area reaches 436,500 (2010). Locals call themselves donostiarras, in Spanish, and donostiarrak, in Basque.
The main economic activities are commerce and tourism, being one of the most famous tourist destinations in Spain. Despite the city’s small size, international events such as the San Sebastián International Film Festival have given it an international dimension. San Sebastián, along with Wrocław, Poland, will be the European Capital of Culture in 2016.

Ibiza

242px-Ibiza_old_town_harbour_(236730060)Ibiza is an island in the Mediterranean Sea 79 km off the coast of the city of Valencia in Spain. It is the third largest of the Balearic Islands, an autonomous community of Spain. With Formentera, it is one of the two Pine Islands or Pityuses. Its largest cities are Ibiza Town (Catalan: Vila d’Eivissa, or simply Vila), Santa Eulària des Riu and Sant Antoni de Portmany. Its highest point, called Sa Talaiassa (or Sa Talaia), is 475 m/1,558 ft above sea level.
The relatively small island and its cities have become world-famous for their associations with tourism, nightlife, and the electronic music the island has originated. It is well known for its summer club scene which attracts very large numbers of tourists, but the island’s government and the Spanish Tourist Office have controversially been working to promote more family-oriented tourism. Noted clubs include Space, Privilege, Amnesia, Ushuaïa, Pacha, DC10, Eden, and Es Paradis. Ibiza is also home to the legendary “port” in Ibiza Town, a popular stop for many tourists and now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Mahon

250px-Mahon_HafenMahon, conventionally known as Port Mahon in English, is a municipality and the capital of Minorca, located in the eastern part of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands, Spain. Mahon has the second deepest natural harbour in the world: 5 km long and up to 900 metres wide. The water is deep but it remains mostly clear due to it being slightly enclosed.
Its population in 2009 was estimated to be 29,495 inhabitants.

The name’s origin is attributed to the Carthaginian general Mago Barca, brother to Hannibal, who is thought to have taken refuge there in 205 BC. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it was part of the Byzantine Empire; it suffered raids from Viking and Arabs, until the Islamic Caliphate of Córdoba conquered it in 903.
Mahon was captured in 1287 from the Moors by Alfonso III of Aragon and incorporated into the Kingdom of Majorca, a vassal kingdom of the Kingdom of Aragon. Its harbour, one of the most strategically important in the western Mediterranean, was re-fortified.
In 1535, the Ottomans under Hayreddin Barbarossa attacked Mahon and took 6,000 captives as slaves back to Algiers, in the Sack of Mahon.

Ciutadella de Menorca

220px-Ciutadella_from_airCiutadella de Menorca or simply Ciutadella (Spanish: Ciudadela) is a town and a municipality in the western end of Minorca, one of the Balearic Islands (Spain). The name means “citadel”. It is one of the two main cities in the island, along with Maó.

Originally founded by the Carthaginians, it was already the seat of a bishop in the 4th century. After being governed by the Moors under the names of Medīna el Jezīra (Arabic: مدينة الجزيرة‎) and Medīna Menūrqa (مدينة منورقة) for several centuries, Ciutadella was recaptured during the reconquista by men serving Alfonso II and became part of the Crown of Aragon. During the Middle Ages, it became an important trading center.

On 9 July 1558, the Turks under Piyale Pasha and Turgut Reis with a powerful Turkish Armada of 140 ships and 15,000 soldiers, put the town under siege for eight days entered and decimated the town. The town was defended by only a few hundred men. All of Ciutadella’s 3,099 inhabitants who survived the siege were taken as slaves to Turkey together with other inhabitants of surrounding villages. In total, 3,452 residents were sold into slavery in the slave markets of Istanbul (Constantinople), Turkey.

Alaior

220px-Alaior,_cota_1.215Alaior (previously in Spanish, Alayor) is a municipality on the island of Minorca, in the Balearic Islands, Spain. It is situated 12 km from the capital, Maó. In 2005 it had a population of 8,671 and it covers an area of 109.77 km².
The principal activities are tourism, shoemaking, cheese, and construction materials.
The patron saint of the municipality is Saint Lawrence and Saint Eulalia. For this reason, the patron festivals are celebrated the weekend after August 10, the saint’s festival day, with jaleo dance.
The principal tourist centers are Son Bou, Minorca Sant Jaume, Torre Solí Cala’n Porter, and Cales Coves.